The Far Side of Mars: Two Distant Marsquakes Detected by InSight

Research areas:
Year:
2022
Authors:
  • Anna C. Horleston
  • John F. Clinton
  • Savas Ceylan
  • Domenico Giardini
  • Constantinos Charalambous
  • Jessica C. E. Irving
  • Philippe Lognonné
  • Simon C. Stähler
  • Géraldine Zenhäusern
  • Nikolaj L. Dahmen
  • Cecilia Duran
  • Taichi Kawamura
  • Amir Khan
  • Doyeon Kim
  • Matthieu Plasman
  • Fabian Euchner
  • Caroline Beghein
  • Éric Beucler
  • Quancheng Huang
  • Martin Knapmeyer
  • Brigitte Knapmeyer‐Endrun
  • Vedran Lekić
  • Jiaqi Li
  • Clément Perrin
  • Martin Schimmel
  • Nicholas C. Schmerr
  • Alexander E. Stott
  • Eléonore Stutzmann
  • Nicholas A. Teanby
  • Zongbo Xu
  • Mark Panning
  • William B. Banerdt
Journal:
The Seismic Record
Volume:
2
Number:
2
Pages:
88-99
Month:
04
ISSN:
2694-4006
BibTex:
Abstract:
For over three Earth years the Marsquake Service has been analyzing the data sent back from the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure—the seismometer placed on the surface of Mars by NASA’s InSight lander. Although by October 2021, the Mars seismic catalog included 951 events, until recently all these events have been assessed as lying within a radius of 100° of InSight. Here we report two distant events that occurred within days of each other, located on the far side of Mars, giving us our first glimpse into Mars’ core shadow zone. The first event, recorded on 25 August 2021 (InSight sol 976), shows clear polarized arrivals that we interpret to be PP and SS phases at low frequencies and locates to Valles Marineris, 146° ± 7° from InSight. The second event, occurring on 18 September 2021 (sol 1000), has significantly more broadband energy with emergent PP and SS arrivals, and a weak phase arriving before PP that we interpret as Pdiff. Considering uncertain pick times and poorly constrained travel times for Pdiff, we estimate this event is at a distance between 107° and 147° from InSight. With magnitudes of MwMa 4.2 and 4.1, respectively, these are the largest seismic events recorded so far on Mars.